Our Syrian Neighbours – جيراننا السوريون

Where the Vultures Gather

Blog #3 – Our Syrian Neighbours

There are a number of topics which would not lure Lebanese people into a conversation (recycling, women rights, traffic rules, animal rights, reading a book…etc.), but there is one which is almost guaranteed to get the whole family, friends, and random people from the street excited and participating: politics. Unfortunately, because of our long history of wars (is there any nation on earth which has not occupied us at some point in history?) and because we are humans (surprise!) much of our political conversations involve an “us-versus-them” language. Christians are scared of Muslims and vice-versa. Some Lebanese do not like Syrians, others Palestinians, others Israelis, and some others do not like anyone whose father’s grandfather is not from their village.

Recently, the Lebanese government has passed a law which greatly limits the freedom of Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Basically, according to this new law, once you go to renew your stay in Lebanon (should be done once every 6 months) you have one of the following options:

A- Show your UN papers and sign a paper promising not to work (scientifically speaking, you can survive on water for eight weeks).

B- Get your employer to proclaim that you work for them and pay a number of fees (Lebanese employers are secretly part of the Global Santa Clause Association).

C- Have a Lebanese family officially ensure your family, that is, be legally bound to pay for all your needs or expenses (Lebanese families are part of the GSCA – see above).

D- Go back to Syria (enter Ed Sheeran singing “I see fire, inside the mountain…”).

As the church, Christians, people who want to be part of the Kingdom of God, the above should challenge and unsettle us. One of the main things which God constantly asks of his people is to love the foreigners among them, for they too were foreigners in Egypt (e.g. Deuteronomy 10: 19). In Luke 10, a scribe declares that the Law can be summarized in the call to love God and love our neighbours. However, he was not sure who this neighbour is. Jesus answers him with the famous parable of the Good Samaritan who helps the Jewish man in distress. Jews and Samaritans were enemies and Jesus is basically saying: all people are your neighbours, even your enemies (or perhaps, especially your enemies). Hence, as a church, we are called to love our neighbours as ourselves. If you see the Syrians as your enemies, then you are called to love them as you love yourself. If you see them as friends, you are still called to the same kind of love. How can we love our Syrian neighbours under this new unjust law?

1 – Stop saying “byestehalo” (they deserve it) or “ahsanlon yerja3o” (it is better for them to return)

No, nobody deserves to die. No, these Syrian families did not wake up one sunny day and decide they need a long camping trip, for three years, in the Bekaa valley, or that they needed to relax in Nabaa (the northern slums of Beirut). Just because the Syrian army occupied Lebanon or just because these people speak a different accent does not make them deserving of humility or death. They are humans. Would we want to be treated as we are treating them? Syria right now is not a safe place for returning refugees. Do I have another law in mind? No! This is why I am not currently a minister in the government or a member of parliament. What I do know is that this law is not just, and we can do better. At the very least, let us not pretend that things are fine.

2- Pressure the government to adopt more humanitarian laws

The church has for too long stood on the side-lines. We are ready to serve people “spiritually” and give out food, but we do not get involved in politics. If we do, it is usually to gain an extra parliament seat or make some rich man happy. When was the last time our churches participated in a rally for peace, women rights, protecting the environment…etc.? Our churches speak up about some moral issues (which are usually sex or poverty) but fail to work towards justice and peace. If we, in any way, have any say in local governmental circles, then we should push for this law to change. Unfortunately, right now, the Christian ministers in the government are happy with this law out of selfishness. We want to protect Lebanon, but if Lebanon fails to be a safe haven for people in their time of need, then we might have lost the Lebanon we want to protect.

3- Ensure a Syrian family

What? You want me to sign a paper saying that any expenses this Syrian family fails to pay will be legally mine to cover? So I am to deny myself, take up my cross, and give my life to this family? He’s crazy, let’s crucify him.

(note: I have not yet done this step myself, but I will these coming weeks. In fact, you do not have to sign any legal papers if you think it is too risky. If you are an employer register your Syrian employees. If not, then help one Syrian family on a monthly personal basis.)

 

Being part of the Kingdom of God is not always easy or fun. I do not always understand what it means to be part of this Kingdom. However, I do know that it is more than singing songs on Sunday, reading the Bible every day, and being an honest citizen. I see more when I read the story of Jesus. Who is our neighbour? Perhaps, if Jesus were to answer this question today, he would tell the story of the Good Syrian who took care of the injured Lebanese traveller.

Let us stand in prayer:

Lord,

Forgive us,

We have many enemies

And few neighbours.

Give us more love for others,

That we may have more love for you.

Amen

مدونة حيث تجتمع الجوارح

ملاحظة: الجوارح أي تلك النسور التي تأكل الجثث

مدونة #3: جيراننا السوريون

هناك عدة مواضيع لن تغري اللبنانيين للتكلم بها، مثل إعادة التدوير أوحقوق المرأة أوقوانين السير أو القراءة، ولكن هناك موضوع وحيد إن تكلمت به فأنا أؤكد لك أن كل العائلة والجيران وصاحب الدكانة على الطريق سيشاركون به: السياسة. للأسف، بسبب تاريخنا الحافل بالحروب، وهل بقي شعب تحت الشمس لم يحتل أرضنا، ولأننا بشر، وهذا اعتقادي الشخصي، معظم أحاديثنا السياسية تعتمد على لغة التخوين والتخويف  من الآخر المختلف عنا. فتسمع المسيحيون يتكلمون عن الآخر المسلم وبعض اللبنيون يخافون من السوري، أو الفلسطيني أو الإسرائيلي، أو أي شخص ليس من قرية جدهم

لقد أصدرت الحكومة اللبنانية في الشهر الفائت قانونا يحد من حرية النازحين السوريين في لبنان بشكل كبير. فبحسب هذا القانون الجديد، عندما يذهب السوري ليجدد إقامته في لبنان مرة كل 6 أشهر يكون أمامه إحدى هذه الخيارات الأربعة

أ – أن يقدّم أوراق تسجيله في الأمم المتحدة ويوقع على تعهد يقول بأنه لا يعمل. والمرء، علميا يا صاحبي، باستطاعته العيش على الماء فقط لمدة 8 أسابيع

ب – أن يكفله رب عمله من خلال دفع عدد من الضرائب، وأرباب العمل في لبنان معروف أنهم جزء من جمعية بابا نويل العالمية السرية

ج – أن تكفله عائلة لبنانية أي تصبح قانونيا مسؤولة عن كل احتياجات وتكاليف العائلة السورية، والعائلات اللبنانية معروفة بأنها من المشتركين مع أرباب العمل في تأسيس جمعية بابا نويل العالمية السرية

د – أن يعود إلى سوريا، وهنا نسمع وفيق حبيب يغني “طلبني على الموت بلبّيك” بصوت حزين

ككنيسة، كمسيحيين، كأناس ندعي أننا جزء من ملكوت الله، يجب على هذا القانون الجديد أن يزعجنا ويحركنا. أحد أهم الوصايا التي أعطاها الرب لشعبه باستمرار هي أن يهتموا بالغرباء لأنهم كانوا غرباء في أرض مصر (مثلا تثنية 10: 19). في لوقا 10، يعلن أحد الكتبة أن تلخيص الناموس هو في محبة الله ومحبة الجار، ولكنه يسأل من هو هذا الجار أو القريب. يجاوبه يسوع بالمثل المشهور عن السامري الصالح الذي ساعد اليهودي المجروح. كان السامريون واليهود أعداء ويسوع يقول من خلال هذا المثل ان كل الناس هم جيراني وحتى أعدائي، أو بالأخص أعدائي. إذا نحن مدعوون ككنيسة أن نحب جيراننا كما أنفسنا. إذا كنت تعتبر أن السوري هو عدوك فأنت مدعو لأن تحبه، وإن كنت تعتبره صديقك فأنت أيضا مدعو لأن تحبه. كيف نستطيع أن نحب جيراننا السوريين وهم تحت هذا القانون الجديد الظالم؟

أولا: التوقف عن قول “بيستاهالو” أو “أحسنلن يرجعو” أي من الأفضل لهم أن يعودوا

لا أحد يستحق الموت. هذه العائلات السورية لم تقرر من تلقاء نفسها أن تخيم تحت السماء لمدة ثلاث سنين   في البقاع أو تمضي فترة نقاهة في النبعة، أي حزام البؤس شمال بيروت. لان الجيش السوري احتل لينان أو لأن السوريين يتكلمون لهجة مختلفة لا يستحقون الذل أو الموت. هم بشر. هل نريد أن نُعامل كما نعاملهم؟ سوريا حاليا ليست مكانا آمنا لعودة النازحين. قد تسألني إن كنت أمتلك قانونا أفضل من القانون الحالي. كلا. لهذا السبب لست وزيرا أو نائبا. ولكن الذي أعرفه هو أن هذا القانون الحالي ظالم وباستطاعتنا كدولة أن نصدر قانونا أفضل. على الأقل، دعونا لا نتصرف وكأن الأمور على ما يرام

ثانيا: الضغط على الحكومة لكي تتبنى قوانين انسانية

لقد وقفت الكنيسة متفرجة على الظلم لمدة طويلة. نحن مستعدون أن نخدم الناس “روحيا” ونعطيهم طعاما ولكننا لا نتدخل بالسياسة. وإن تدخلنا يكون من أجل نيل مقعد أو ارضاء شخص غني. متى كانت آخر مرة شاركنا فيها بمظاهرة من أجل السلام أوحقوق المرأة أوحماية البيئة…إلخ؟ تتكلم كنائسنا كثيرا عن بعض الأمور الأخلاقية، كالجنس والفقر، ولكننا ننسى العدالة والسلام. إذا كان لنا في أي دائرة حكومية أو مبنى رسمي أي قدرة على التأثير على صناع القرار فيجب علينا أن نضغط لتغيير هذا القانون. للأسف، الوزراء المسيحيون هم من يؤيدون هذا القانون، لربما من دافع أناني لحماية لبنان. وكأننا غير منتبهين من أنه إن أصبح لبنان غير مُرحب بالغرباء فسنخسر ذلك اللبنان الجميل الذي نريد أن نحميه

ثالثا: اكفل عائلة سورية

ماذا؟ تريدني أن أوقع على ورقة تحمّلني مسؤولية قانونية لأدفع اي مستحقات أو تكاليف لا تدفعها هذه العائلة السورية؟ هل جننت؟ أتريدني ان أنكر نفسي وأحمل صليبي وأعطي حياتي لهذه العائلة؟ هيا يا شباب، لنصلبه

أرجو الإنتباه أني انا شخصيا لم اقدم بعد على هذه الخطوة أعلاه ولكني سأفعل ذلك في الأسابيع القادمة. إن كنت تخاف من توقيع أوراق رسمية خذ على عاتقك الإهتمنام بعائلة واحدة شهريا بشكل شخصي. وإن كنت رب عمل فاتبع القانون

ليس من السهل أن  نكون جزء من ملكوت الله. أنا لا أفهم دائما معنى أن أكون جزء من الملكوت. ولكنني أعرف هذا، أن الملكوت هو أكثر من الترنيم يوم الأحد وقراءة الكتاب المقدس صباحا وأن أكون مواطنا صالحا. أرى أكثر من ذلك عندما أقرأ قصة يسوع. من هم جيراننا؟ لربما، إن سألنا يسوع اليوم، سيروي لنا قصة عن السوري الصالح الذي أنقذ مسافرا لبنانيا جريحا

دعونا نقف لنصلي

يا رب

سامحنا

فنحن نمتلك الكثير من الأعداء

والقليل من الجيران

أعطنا أن نحب الآخرين أكثر

لكي نحبك أنت أكثر

آمين

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Our Syrian Neighbours – جيراننا السوريون

  1. Nabil, great post. Your words should resonate, and ultimately we all need to look at what we can individually do to alleviate the suffering of our neighbors. You present a necessary challenge. While I have great sympathy for the individual refugees suffering at this time (and no non-refugee can fully understand to their acute suffering), I have sympathy for the individual nation-states suffering as well. In hosting millions of displaced people, Lebanon is carrying a burden that no other country in modern history has ever been asked to bear. I cannot imagine a single western country taking on the population influx like Lebanon has. I’ve heard voices in the west sling out criticism of government decisions, but I do not see worthwhile action to address the desperate situation. While we can (and should) question the justice of certain policies, the international community must support Lebanon through a difficult situation. You are right to call on Lebanese to do more for refugees, and I call on the international community to do more for Lebanon. This means more and better aid to refugees, investment and development in the Lebanese communities suffering as they play host, and, most importantly, a serious initiatives to bring a peaceful resolution to the conflict. Syrians need help, and Lebanon needs help. Like you have stated so well, everyone needs to do their part.

    Liked by 1 person

    • thank you brent 🙂
      yes I agree that Lebanon is facing a huge challenge and the global conmunity can and should do more. unfortunately, when the war started, the Lebanese government opened the borders unconditionally, and now they want all the Syrians (with this new law) to leave. I think that we can and should have an organized law that on one hand makes sure the Lebanese economy does not collapse (even more) while on the other hand allows refugees to find a safe haven from the war in Syria. yes, all should do more…

      Like

I would love to hear your thoughts...أحب أن أسمع آرائكم

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s